PART ONE: Why is California the Only State Where Trust Loans Can Equal Low Property Taxes for Life?

TRUST LOANS

In every American state but one, in all 3,143 counties in America,  trust funds have the reputation for being a rich person’s tool for deferring and/or lessening taxes…  And that one state where trust beneficiaries have more options, are in fact actually able to receive or assign funds outside the “normal” distribution schedule, with trust loans for a buyout of sibling property shares, for example – is California and all its’ 58 counties.   

Despite the fact that beneficiaries of  trusts in California are totally blocked by a Spendthrift Clause that is written into most California trust funds, therefore are unable to get an inheritance cash advance assignment – they can, with the help of the California  Proposition 58 tax break, if they are inheriting real property from parents, inheriting parents property taxes capped at 2% thanks to CA Proposition 13 – get a large  trust loan to work with.

As most of us know, beneficiaries in California have the right to  buy out co-beneficiaries’ (typically siblings) shares in an inherited property through a loan to an irrevocable trust.  Siblings that, for example, refuse to retain an inherited property, and are inflexibly intent on selling to an outside buyer.  Moreover, the same access to additional distribution options like a trust loan, exist for business property owners as well… Which is why there has been so much push-back against the co-called  2020 “Proposition 13” business property tax being floated  out there for California property owners to vote on.  As you can guess, this is not a popular tax!

That is precisely why so many people love owning property, and residing in, the state of California. If you’re inheriting property in California from your parents, and it’s in trust, as we mentioned,  even if the ever-present Spendthrift Clause prevents you from obtaining a probate advance or inheritance cash advance assignment from a standard inheritance advance company – you can always set yourself up with a low tax rate for your inherited property… plus get cash from a trust loan within five to seven days generally.

Every other state in the union should, by all rights, have property tax breaks similar to Proposition 13 and Proposition 58, for parent to child transfer of property, or Proposition 193, for grandparent to grandchild property transfer

However, California is, sadly, the one lonely state where you can avoid property tax reassessment, capped at 2% with Prop 13… Plus keep parents property taxes and transfer parents property taxes, inheriting parents property taxes at super low base rates. With the ability to use Prop 58 property tax transfer, with, as real estate lawyers usually call it, “a parent to child exclusion”.  Why?  We imagine it’s simply a matter of lack of leadership to pave the way, and put pressure on local politicians, as Howard Jarvis did in the mid to late 1970s –  hitting paydirt with the CA Proposition 13 tax break in 1978! The history of which can be found here.

So the great thing about inheriting property in California is that you can not only buy out beneficiaries share of an inherited house – you can also keep that contested property from parents, with a trust loan, and wind up paying incredibly discounted property tax as long as you retain that property – plus apply the same tax break to a secondary property as well, if you’re in that position, and can afford to upkeep that home or property as well.  As discussed on business sites such as Commercial Loan Corpwith articles and interviews that dig into trust loan issues using Proposition 58 as a tax break solution

As you most likely already know, this makes it possible for a beneficiary to buyout  shares of inherited property from another sibling, or co-beneficiary – which lawyers call “a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares” – or “buying out a sibling’s share of an inherited house” – or, as realtors refer to it, the “transfer of property between siblings” or “sibling to sibling property transfer”. Always through an irrevocable trust loan lender you feel comfortable with, that you know specializes in trust loans, various uses of trusts, estates, and inheritance assets.

And the catch is, that you always need a trust lender to help you determine and assemble all the complex requirements needed to get approved for the California Proposition 58 equal distribution process. The trouble is, it doesn’t happen by itself – something that many beneficiaries don’t fully understand, when they start out down the road with this process.

>> Click Here to Continue to Part Two…

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