PART FOUR: Irrevocable Trust Distribution Loans

Irrevocable Trust Distribution Loans

Stronger Family Security With Lower Property Taxes

As beneficiaries and heirs in California inherit family real estate, they are also inheriting property taxes. They generally transfer parents property taxes; taking advantage of property tax transfer – which attorneys often refer to as parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion… thanks to Proposition 13; and Proposition 58 which also enables beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares.

Regrettably, siblings in California who are trying to keep property left to them by parents, frequently find themselves involved in emotional and financial conflict with co-beneficiaries who wish to sell their inherited property to an outside buyer.

Fortunately, many siblings looking to retain that type of emotionally based property for their family will often be able to buy out beneficiaries looking to sell their property shares with the help of a trust lender providing a loan to an irrevocable trust, typically referred to as a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares. 

As many Californians know by now, a trust loan, working in concert with CA Proposition 58 tax relief, makes it possible for beneficiaries to sell shares of their inherited property, also called a “beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares”, which is typically just buying out a sibling’s share of an inherited house, maybe with an acre or two of land – or, as real estate lawyers refer to it, “the transfer of property between siblings” or “sibling to sibling property transfer” – by lending money to an irrevocable trust – typically from a seasoned California irrevocable trust loan lender, commonly called trust lenders, simply specializing in trust loans of all sizes.     

Property tax transfer benefits furnished by CA Proposition 58, provides a parental property transfer tax break typically called “parent to child transfer”… whereas CA Proposition 193 provides the same type of tax relief, only for grandparent to grandchild property tax transfer – while California Proposition 13 maintains their parents low property tax base, capped at 2% for beneficiaries, thankfully avoiding property tax reassessment at current tax rates basically forever, which adds up to significant numbers over the years and decades.

Beneficiaries, with these sort of inherited property conflicts, are usually motivated to save on property taxes, and generally enlist the help of a known trust lender in California that is experienced with loans to irrevocable trusts, plus utilizing California Proposition 13 and the Proposition 58 property transfer tax break. Exactly as the O’Neil family wished to do, as it happens with the help of a company called Commercial Loan Corporation.

If qualified, and over 55 years of age, many property owners involved in this exact process can also apply a significantly lower tax rate to a secondary dwelling, as long as they own the initial inherited property for 2 years or longer.

Rules, Regulations and Critical Steps for Irrevocable Trust Loans – in Concert with California Proposition 58 or Proposition 193:

1. Deciding who will keep the property
2. Determining final trust loan amount
3. Loan to trust/estate is executed
4. Trust lender equalizes cash distribution to beneficiaries
5. Property is transferred to acquiring beneficiaries name
6. Parent child exclusion is filed, avoiding property tax reassessment
7. Five to seven day trust funding turnaround is expected
8. The trust loan is repaid, finalizing a win-win family agreement
9. No Hidden Fees

An Alternative Lending Solution for Heirs and Beneficiaries

Both beneficiaries featured here, of the O’Neil family, discovered the Commercial Loan Corp with the help of their real estate attorney. They were both extremely motivated to get a $267,000 trust loan underway as quickly as possible.

The personal issue that appeared to motivate the initial call to the trust lender, besides saving money on property taxes, is the fact that both beneficiaries have wanted to keep this property in the family for a long time – to pass the property on to a daughter, enabling that daughter to keep the property as well. She wouldn’t be able to afford this property if the taxes went up, so it was essential that they reserved a low Proposition 13 driven property tax base.

Accepted assessed value of the inherited property was $400,000. Annual property tax savings was estimated to be $1,970. One beneficiary wanted to keep the property, with the other beneficiary looking to sell to an outside buyer, however both siblings appeared to get along well and basically agreed on all key points, of both minor and major importance – and after no time at all agreed to keep the property, as soon as Senior Account Executive Tanis Alonso from Commercial Loan Corporation explained the tax savings and the trust loan and Proposition 58 combined process to them, in simple easy-to-understand terms.

Both siblings agreed that their positive childhood memories were attached to the house they were inheriting, and this was important to retain, and maintain, for both siblings emotional and financial well being.

Bottom line, the cost of selling the property outright to an outside buyer would have been $24,000. Cost to the O’Brien family using the Commercial Loan Corp loan-to-trust process (i.e., not having to sell the property), while happily being able to keep their parents beloved  home forever, at a low yearly tax rate, which is only $10,602. Savings for the O’Brien siblings was a significant $13,398.

If you have questions about a loan to an irrevocable trust, you can reach Tanis Alonso at 877-464-1066.