PART THREE: If Every State in America Had Property Tax Relief Similar to California…

California Property Taxes

Property Tax Relief for Residential & Commercial Property Owners in Every State ~ Regardless of Net Worth and Property Evaluation

It’s crystal clear to many of us that every state in the United States could propose, and pass into law, a property tax system with property tax relief measures resembling California’s Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.

As in California, states with governors that actually care about the citizens in their state; or, more specifically, residential and commercial property owners in their state – could also make use of loans to irrevocable trusts from licensed trust lenders, to provide a unique, effective way to deal with property-based sibling conflicts – or simply to mitigate crippling property tax hikes.

Again, as in all 58 counties in the state of California, with the advent of these property tax breaks, middle class family members in all states could walk through life happier, feeling a tiny bit wealthier perhaps, with a first-time sense that there is, in their state, a fair-minded property tax system in place; that regular working families can benefit from, similar to property tax relief in California — and not just V.I.P. tax breaks for wealthy property owners. 

So middle class property owners, estate heirs and trust beneficiaries would end up with a win-win inheritance or estate experience… Regardless what state they are in, what their net-worth is, or how much their inherited real estate is valued at.  As in California, property tax relief would exist in an even playing field, in all states for all property owners, for all heirs and beneficiaries who are inheriting real property.

Howard Jarvis and his team of property tax relief proponents originated California Proposition 13 property tax breaks, which later spawned Proposition 58 tax benefits, including the ability to keep parents property taxes, while avoiding property tax reassessment… However they did not realize, in their own time, was that the property tax measures they had invented, actually reflected the property ownership and fair-minded taxation controls that the founders of this country had in mind from the  very beginning.

Property Tax Relief Patriots 

Yearly uncontrolled, unpredictable, crippling property tax hikes every year – that sees elderly widows being evicted, and aging retirees and veterans living on fixed incomes foreclosed on, and thrown onto the street – was certainly NOT what the founders and rebellious patriots had in mind over two hundred years ago, when they fought their way out from under egregious taxation imposed by a certain British king.

Different, yet similarly effective measures is essentially what a certain successful patriotic landlord named Howard Jarvis accomplished when he and other supporters of property tax relief fought for Proposition 13, for the ability to avoid  property tax reassessment under present day rates; for parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion when benefiting from parents’ property tax transfer. They won the right of CA Proposition 13 transfer of property, and won the ability to transfer parents property taxes and keep parents property taxes, when inheriting a home and/or land and when inheriting property taxes associated with their inheritance.  They managed to put authentic property tax relief in place in the great state of California, in 1978 — not just for V.I.P.s and the wealthy (as current critics falsely claim), but for the middle class, and all Californian property owners .

Therefore, if we want to benefit from a long-term, reliable system of property tax relief measures, and get out from under yearly, frequently debilitating property tax – we’re going to have to educate ourselves on what type of property tax relief system each state requires; and go about discussing these property tax relief measures with approachable government representatives, approximating what  Mr. Jarvis had accomplished, with the help of other property tax relief patriots, 42 years ago.

PART TWO: If Every State in America Had Property Tax Relief Similar to California…

California Transfer Parents Property Taxes To A Child

All things considered, there is no good reason residential, commercial and industrial property owners in every state in the United States  shouldn’t have property tax relief, modeled after California tax relief.  And not wind up in a nightmare with the tax people as they did in California. with widows  and elderly veterans and retirees living off fixed incomes being evicted from their homes on a regular basis… prior to 1978.  

This is really where the major problem is with many middle class estates, along with estate taxes often enough. Without property tax benefits, as California has had since 1978, so many beneficiaries in so many different estate, inheriting property from parents, simply can’t afford the upkeep and property taxes on their inherited home, and frequently are forced to sell their parents’ property. Often against their will.

There is a lot of talk among real estate attorneys and property tax advisors in states other than California about adopting some sort of property tax shelter to help middle class Americans in a genuine fashion, long-term.  Instead of consistently bleeding the general public dry year after year, decade after decade… while multi-millionaires and billionaires pay less and less taxes by raising the national debt by a trillion or two.  Especially during so-called conservative administrations, which generally lean towards assisting the wealthy with tax cuts   while ignoring tax relief needs of the middle class and working classes. Moreover,  particularly in the midst of a global Pandemic, where we have millions our of work, no federal leadership, and 30 or so states in the Midwest and Deep South in deep trouble with Coronavirus health and economic issues piling up, with no end in sight.  What better time than now to pass national property tax relief, benefiting all states.

To out it bluntly, it’s time that the middle class have their day, and get to enjoy genuine property tax relief to free up some more cash so they can enjoy their lives a bit more, with a little less financial stress. However, the trick is to enlist the interest of the public itself, as well as certain name brand  politicians, which would, if they had some intelligence and common sense, endear them to their constituents forever.

If, by any chance you reside in California, and you happen to be a beneficiary inheriting property from your parents, consider yourself to be very lucky. Instead of buckling under to family conflicts revolving around property issues, you’d be able to buyout siblings’ property shares, while retaining a low Proposition 13 protected base property tax rate – plus always  take advantage, anywhere in the state, of your right to avoid property tax reassessment; to transfer parents property taxes, and keep parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes.

This is why so many property tax advisors and real estate lawyers in various locations believe every single state should have a property tax measure similar to CA Proposition 13, Proposition 58 & Prop 193.  The California model is a perfect prototype to mirror for effective, seamless property tax breaks;  including the right to transfer parents property taxes, inheriting property taxes and the ability to keep parents property taxes for all property tax transfer scenarios involving parent to child transfer or parent to child exclusion from present day property tax rates…  involving beneficiaries of family trusts – most importantly, avoiding property tax reassessment.  To mirror Proposition 58 type of benefits, states without property tax relief would need to also adopt the ability to help beneficiaries buy out sibling property – as realtors call it, “transfer of property between siblings” or “sibling to sibling property transfer”, or buying out siblings’ share of a house.  And beneficiaries everywhere, if they are aware of it, rarely disagree.

Beneficiaries, as well as residential, industrial and commercial property owners in every state in America need to research these forms of property tax relief at resource blogs like “Property Tax Transfer”;  as well as  Websites that focus on California Proposition 58, on the property tax transfer process, and on how trust loans from trust lenders work, to help beneficiaries buy out sibling property, from start to finish… outlining how the unique combination of a trust loan with Proposition 58 serves to equalize the  distribution  of  cash for trust beneficiaries… at Websites like “Trust & Estate Loans”… 

Or perhaps at a well known, premium trust lender’s Website that delves into the actual nuts & bolts of the Proposition 58 / trust lending process, for example at the popular, first-class Commercial Loan Corp. Website; which is, arguably, the most visited Website of it’s kind in this specific lending category.

This gives beneficiaries enough information to successfully avoid estate conflicts between siblings; with some beneficiaries insisting on selling inherited property, and some wanting to keep their inherited property, at a low long-term property tax base. 

>> Click Here to go to Part Three…

PART ONE: If Every State in America Had Property Tax Relief Similar to California…

California Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfer

Considering every state in America, if we were to project into the future and take into account all the ways we could avoid wasting money as a  result of inheriting  property from our parents… If you were expecting property as an inheritance – what would you do to make sure you were inheriting a home you could afford to keep? 

Nothing comes to mind?

What if every state in the union embraced the same sort of property tax breaks that California has employed since 1978… when Proposition 13 was voted into law so every residential, industrial and commercial   property owner would be able to avoid property tax reassessment. 

Subsequently, CA Proposition 58 was passed in 1986, enabling the transfer of property between siblings, making it possible to buyout your siblings’ property shares, plus insuring that you keep parents property taxes, basically forever – maintaining a low Proposition 13 guaranteed property tax base, capped at  a 2% maximum rate – all with the help of a loan to an irrevocable trust. 

Sounds simple, however it’s not quite as simple as it sounds. You need a reliable trust lender to help you, and you must qualify for all  the requirements necessary to be approved for Proposition 58 – in order to take advantage of it. 

Given the stunning unraveling of the job-based economy over the past several  months in the United States, due to all the lay-offs and so-called “furloughs” resulting from the Coronavirus crisis – as of August 2020 there are over 51 million lost jobs nation-wide, and more than 6.7 million unemployed in California alone… although what percentage of that is  temporary or permanent – we don’t yet know.

Frankly, the danger that the loss of millions of jobs poses to the country, not to mention the startling lack of engagement exhibited by the federal government, only exacerbates the health crisis.  Therefore, it’s clear to most of us that it’s high time lawmakers in Washington begin to put in place some permanent financial guardrails to help working class and middle class households lower expenses to some degree, to hopefully free up some spending cash for those that are out of work, with no resolution yet in sight. 

One such guardrail would be to free up additional personal spending cash by lowering property taxes on the middle class, whose spending habits, historically, keep the economy flowing.  It would make a great deal of sense right now, with no end to the Coronavirus challenges in sight, to not defer certain taxes – but to completely eliminate them! 

Most likely,  the least risky form of taxation to lower right now would be property taxes, as we have a successful property tax relief model in California to mirror in all the other states – preventing politicians from claiming that it probably wouldn’t work out, so why bother… why try.   Clearly, property  tax relief has worked out, and continues to be a successful system, in California. 

It would certainly help to prop up a flagging middle class besieged by an unprecedented Pandemic, and corresponding recession, to put in place residential and commercial property tax breaks similar to Californian property tax relief measures made possible by CA Proposition 13, enabling property owners, in the wake of  transfer of property measures, to avoid property tax reassessment every year… Making sure to transfer parents property taxes when  inheriting property and inheriting property taxes from parents… in other words inheriting property taxes that equal the lowest taxes your parents paid after 1978. 

Prior to 1978, property taxes were unpredictable and way too high in California… until trust  beneficiaries and heirs of estates were given “parent to child transfer”, or “parent to child exclusion” as real estate attorneys refer to it.  

Interestingly enough, since 1986 California trust loans have been used to resolve seemingly unsolvable inherited property conflicts between siblings; working alongside CA Proposition 58. Once approved, Prop 58 helps heirs to buyout sibling property through trust liquidity – siblings that are intent on selling their property shares… Generally called a beneficiary buyout of sibling property shares, sibling to sibling property transfer, or a transfer of property between siblings – siblings looking to sell their property shares wind up with more liquidity in trust than if they had sold out directly to an outside buyer.  Conversely, folks looking to keep their inherited property can avoid property tax reassessment at present day rates, going forward; retaining the same low property tax base their parents had. 

That’s the real genius of the property tax relief system in California… and the bottom line gift for middle class home owners and non-wealthy landlords in California – the legal right to avoid property tax reassessment. 

The magic of trust loans from trust lenders is that they make it possible, when working in concert with Proposition 58, to equalize cash to beneficiaries – in other words Prop 58 helps heirs to buyout sibling property – if they’re looking to sell an inherited property held up by beneficiaries of the same trust that are looking to keep the same inherited home and/or land…

For once, this would force estate property conflicts to end up as win-win scenarios for heirs of estates or trust beneficiaries in states other than California.  And we’re talking about beneficiaries who generally do not get along terribly well, as is illustrated by the frequently hard-nosed conflicts associated with their inherited property issues… where one or two want to keep their inherited home…  while several wish to sell… One wants to evaluate the property at one amount, the others at a different amount. Many families, typically the siblings, just can’t agree on anything.

And yet other families agree on everything in these estate or inherited property matters…. So you just never know.  However, typically there are some problematic conflicts to address.  And that’s where a trust lender tends to come into the picture – as we have said, to “equalize cash” for  those who wish to sell, while setting  a low base tax rate for siblings who are set on keeping the home inherited from beloved parents. 

>> Click Here to go to Part Two…

A New Threat Arises ~ Critics of Property Tax Relief Look to Unravel CA Proposition 58 with (2020) Prop 19

Vote No Proposition 19

A Threat to Proposition 58, Parent to Child Exclusion, Arises

If they were keeping both eyes open, most property owners in California were looking, tentatively, for signs on the horizon of any new threat to the popular property tax break known as the “parent to child exclusion” meaning exclusion from having your home, or any other property, reassessed every year at current property tax rates.  Being that this exclusion is the the main foundation  that property tax relief in California is built on, if you were serious about dismantling property tax relief in this state, it would be likely that you’d go after this critical tax break in earnest.

So naturally, at the last moment, when everyone thought they might have  “dodged the bullet” in terms of efforts to dismantle Proposition 13 or Proposition 58 one more time, relentless critics of California Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 decided to add one more measure to the mix, to remove the parent to child exclusion allowed under Proposition 58, from California home owners… A measure they are calling Proposition 19.

No longer being able to avoid property tax reassessment would be a truly devastating event for home owners who depend on extra spendable cash freed up by the money they save from the lack of property tax reassessment.  Losing the parent to child exclusion, in an already hyper-expensive state, would devastate millions of Californians.  Not to mention the possibility of the so-called Split-Roll or “Proposition 15” commercial property tax, which would certainly add to the devastation by raising industrial and commercial property taxes, including apt. building landlords, forcing landlords to raise rents on residential and business tenants…

Or we could talk about trust beneficiaries or estate heirs losing their ability to get  a loan for hundreds of thousands of dollars to an irrevocable trust to buyout siblings who are intent on selling their share of a beloved inherited home, along with establishing a low property tax base made possible by Proposition 13, working in tandem with Proposition 58.  And the list goes on. 

Without being partisan or subjective – it’s fairly clear to any reasonable person that would herald in grave economic disturbance, and even disaster, for the entire state, where middle class  and working class people are concerned.   Obviously, many residents in Malibu or  Beverly Hills or Santa Barbara would not be feeling the pinch.  However, we’re not talking about the 1%.   

This brainchild of C.A.R. and the CA Legislature is, if you step back and think about it, not only brazen but also short-sighted, as they are actually looking  to fund special interests with revenue from property taxes — right smack in the middle of a Pandemic.  With over 6.7 million Californians having signed up for unemployment checks, these critics of property tax relief want to remove these universally popular property tax breaks protected by  Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.  Benefits that middle class and working class California families have become  accustomed to, and depend on. 

Proposition 58 Particulars

Most Californians are familiar with Proposition 58 and the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion. As you know, California Proposition 58 serves to protect folks who owe $8,500 or more in additional property taxes, while they settle their affairs. Prop 58 also allows beneficiaries who wish to keep inherited property in their family to buyout co-beneficiaries’ property shares, through a trust loan, and helps those looking to keep their inherited home also keep a low Proposition 13 protected property tax base their parents paid. And everyone goes away happy, win-win, all the way around.

In 1986, to protect families from massive property tax hikes, voters passed Proposition 58, revising the California constitution to ensure transfers of property between parents and children could be executed with the right to avoid property tax reassessment. Under Proposition 58 property of any value, plus additional property with up to a million dollars of assessed value, can be transferred between parents and children without reassessment.

However, the chief sponsor of ACA-11 (Proposition 19) the California Association of Realtors (C.A.R.) came along and decided to spoil all these critical win-win protections. C.A.R. assembled enough signatures to get their initiative on the ballot. Apparently, C.A.R. is motivated by their monetary interest in drumming up new home sales, regardless of the fact that the measure creates a multi-billion-dollar tax increase statewide, will throw the entire middle class California economy into chaos, already in turmoil due to the Covid-19 health and unemployment crisis…

The 2020 Proposition 19 would look to repeal the 1986 Proposition 58 and impose reassessment of inherited or transferred property within families. The one exception being if the property was used as the principal residence of the beneficiary to whom it was transferred, and that exclusion is even capped.

Unintended or Intended Consequences?

The Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) estimated that the repeal of the “inter-generational transfer protections” guaranteed by the Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, and Proposition 193 grandparent to grandchild exemption would, if passed, cause somewhere between 40,000 to 60,000 families in California to be crippled economically by higher yearly property taxes.

Obviously, most middle class families would be forced to immediately sell an inherited home left to them by a surviving parent. Thus, a serious imposition has been placed on the “right to choose” for countless middle class families… simply so realtors can sell a few more homes on the market.  The trade off does seem to be rather uneven.  If Proposition 19 passes, all those beneficiaries in California will be expected to move in to their parent’s home and make it their primary residence within one year of their surviving parent’s death. 

The basis for this measure is unrealistic on its’ face, for a number of reasons… Many beneficiaries are already home owners, and pay out a fair amount of cash every month already to maintain their own mortgage and/or property upkeep. Moreover, if a beneficiary has a large family, and his or her parent’s home is not spacious enough – what alternatives are left for these folks?

If Mom or Dad’s home is situated a long distance away from a beneficiary’s place of work, and/or the spouse’s workplace – and perhaps inconveniently far away from their children’s school, adding possibly an additional 60 or 90 minutes on the freeway each way, back and forth every day… What options will these families have to look to? 

Critics of property tax relief in California are proposing somewhat unrealistic measures that, although they may look good on paper from a financial perspective,  they fail to incorporate realistic issues and scenarios that exist for regular people with regular lives. 

So vote your conscience in November.  We suggest you vote “No to Proposition 19”.

Information and Trust Loan Funding

For more details on the C.A.R. originated Proposition 19 effort to turn back the clock on property tax relief in California, you can go to CaliforniaProposition58.org

For more information on trust loans working in concert with Proposition 58, go to Commercial Loan Corp   Or to apply for a trust loan and speak to an account representative, go to “Apply for a Trust Loan”…  Simply to read up on Prop 13 and Prop 58 parent to child exclusion, as well as on critics of property tax relief in California,  plus the Covid-19 effect on real estate throughout the state – please go to the article: Coronavirus Crisis is the Last Thing the California Real Estate Market Needed!

PART THREE: The CA Proposition 15 Split-Roll “Trojan Horse” Commercial Property Tax is Coming Up for a Vote!

California Proposition 15 2020

Let’s project ahead for a moment…  In terms of the state you may live in, of the best way to avoid inherited property being a money pit (in terms of property taxes and upkeep), of it being a home you cannot afford to keep… So let’s keep it simple.  If every state in the union adopted the same sort of property tax relief that California has, with the right to keep parents property taxes, where you can avoid property tax reassessment, as with California’s 1978 Proposition 13, and Proposition 58 voted into law in 1986; we’d all be in good shape.

In a perfect world this wouldn’t be all that difficult to attain, if every state would wake up and smell the coffee, and instate property tax breaks like California has.  Frankly, if we all had representatives in  the Congress and Senate who actually cared about their job and cared about doing their job for us – this could easily be accomplished, if the will was there. 

Why shouldn’t every state offer property tax relief like California? It’s like dental care.  Why doesn’t every healthcare plan have genuine dental care?  Not $1500 owrth and then you’re on your own, but real dental.  Can with property tax relief.  Why shouldn’t every property owner in every state have property tax relief to make their life easier… While billionaires and multi-millionaires enjoy outrageous tax breaks every year.

Every  beneficiary or heir inheriting property from parents, or simply  residents or landlords or business folks owning property, would be able to afford to keep their commercial property, or an inherited home from parents.   As in California, this affects all types of property transfers… Giving every beneficiary the ability to keep parents property taxes, or benefiting from property tax transfer, inheriting property taxes – from parents’ low tax base of 2% thanks to Prop 13… This is the property tax base that helps property owners so profoundly in California.  Why not in every state?  

Without property tax breaks, as California has had since 1978, so many heirs to so many estates, or beneficiaries of so many trusts… in so many different states, inheriting property from parents, simply can’t afford the upkeep and property taxes on an  inherited home, and frequently are forced to sell their parents’ property. Often against their will.

We can simply call it “property tax relief”, the right to keep parents property taxes, similar to what you can accomplish in California; with Proposition 13, or during property tax transfer, utilizing CA Proposition 58 – keeping property taxes much lower, avoiding property tax reassessment. Beneficiaries who are inheriting property in any of the 58 counties in California, always have a low tax base not to exceed 2% from California Proposition 13, giving beneficiaries huge tax benefits from property inherited from a parent.

Plus there is always the ability to make good use of a loan to an irrevocable trust – as trust loans from trust lenders are used in conjunction with Proposition 58 to equalize cash to beneficiaries looking to sell an inherited property held up by beneficiaries of the same trust looking to keep the same inherited home and/or land… for once making scenarios like that a win-win experience for everyone in an estate or trust situation with a trust loan from a reliable trust lender. Instead of experiencing, repeatedly, problematic family conflicts revolving around property issues like this.

Just like in California, every state in America should be able to take advantage of the right to keep parents property taxes, to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes. If, by any chance you reside in California, and you happen to be a beneficiary inheriting property from your parents, or an older person simply maintaining property you have owned for years, consider yourself very lucky.

This is why so many real estate lawyers in various locations these days strongly believe every state should have a property tax measure similar to California Proposition 13 and Proposition 58.  Beneficiaries everywhere agree wholeheartedly.

However, one gets the sense that every property owner may not be fully aware of all these tax benefits in California. The CA Proposition 13 tax shelter benefits during and after property tax transfer (with CA Proposition 58) saves beneficiaries big bucks, being able to transfer parents property taxes, being able to keep parents property taxes… inheriting property taxes that are capped.  We should never forget that   in California it’s just as many middle class people as wealthy folks who are able to avoid property tax reassessment at present day evaluation, through Proposition 13 benefits… And that saves you major money every year off property taxes… typically in the neighborhood of $6,200+ per year in fact.  Not a million dollars, but then again not nothing either!  

PART TWO: The CA Proposition 15 Split-Roll “Trojan Horse” Commercial Property Tax is Coming Up for a Vote!

2020 California Proposition 15

Gifting & Inheriting Property: Property Tax Relief Basics

Gifting your primary house, or secondary inherited property to your adult children – is it worth it?  We imagine for many it is, otherwise why would they do it?  And for others, well… what can you say, it’s simply a matter of subjective opinion.  And let’s never  forget that under Proposition 13 in California you can get the same low tax base benefits applied to your first primary residence inheritance to a secondary inherited property.  So there are built in benefits. 

Also, there are emotional reasons not just financial ones involved in all this…  It’s a real gift of love that often leads to an even closer relationship. And your offspring should realize that, and most probably do. In simple terms, it may be a principal residence, and that type of transfer may actually cause future tax appreciation of the value of that home, as a taxable item, when it might otherwise have avoided property tax reassessment if the property had remained in the decedent’s name with Proposition 13 transfer of property tax relief benefits. 

Nationwide Property Tax Relief Urgently Needed for Residential & Commercial Property Owners in a Severe, Pandemic Economy

This is the biggest problem for most beneficiaries, middle class  property owners and elderly home owners – i.e., property taxes; transfer taxes; etc.  This often forces folks to sell a beloved inherited property, as they simply can’t afford to pay the taxes on it every year, deal with utilities, upkeep, repairs, and so on.

We should all address the fact that, especially now, in the midst of an unprecedented Pandemic, with literally tens of millions of Americans out of work or  under-employed – with over 12 million people staring down the dark tunnel of foreclosure or eviction – every state in the union should be adopting, without delay, the same sort of property tax relief as California’s 1978 Proposition 13, as well as other critical property tax relief measures such as CA Proposition 58 property tax transfer benefits, voted into law in 1986.

At the risk of stating the obvious, it’s worth noting that these tax relief measures have become life-savers to property owners, as well as renters who enjoy lower rentals due to the ability their landlords have to avoid property tax reassessment.  We’re all aware of what things were like pre-1978, before Proposition 13 came about and began preventing the frequent foreclosures of the 1970’s, where we saw numerous elderly widows with fixed incomes being thrown out of their homes, literally onto the street, because they could not afford to pay egregiously high, unpredictable property taxes.

In fact, most middle class home owners at that time had trouble paying unusually high tax rates, and lived year to year with the shadow of the California ‘property tax guillotine’ looming over their heads.  In fact that is exactly what the situation looks like in many states now,  or in many expensive counties.  This is where the major problem is with most middle class estates, not with estate planning. Without property tax benefits, as in California, many beneficiaries inheriting property from parents simply can’t afford the upkeep and property taxes on an inherited home, and frequently are forced to sell their parents’ property right away. Often against their will.
 
We hear a great deal of chatter lately, among realtors and real estate attorneys in various states, about “adopting a property tax shelter” for all property tax transfers, when inheriting a home from a parent.  Or we can simply call it “property tax relief” similar to property tax benefits that are taken for granted in California; with Proposition 13, or during a property tax transfer or a sibling property share buyout; utilizing CA Proposition 58, and a trust loan – keeping property taxes much lower on a permanent basis, avoiding property tax reassessment basically forever.  

Beneficiaries who are inheriting property from a parent or step-parent  in any of the 58 counties in the state of California are generally protected from property tax reassessment. And have a low tax base to look forward to, not to exceed 2% as stipulated by California Proposition 13.

And let’s not forget having the ability to make good use of a loan to an irrevocable trust, working in concert with Proposition 58, something a lot of people don’t know anything about. With trust loans from trust lenders being used to equalize cash to beneficiaries looking to sell an inherited property held up by beneficiaries of the same trust, looking to keep the same inherited home and/or land… For once making scenarios like that a win-win situation for everyone associated with an estate or trust, with a trust loan from a reliable trust lender. Instead of experiencing problematic family conflicts revolving around property issues. 

Residential & Business Property Tax Breaks in All States

Beneficiaries and home owners, as well as commercial and industrial property owners of all types, all across America, should be getting familiar with the way they implement property tax breaks in California. How they handle having the right to keep parents property taxes, to transfer parents property taxes, when inheriting property taxes. If, by any chance you reside in California, and you happen to be a beneficiary inheriting property from your parents, consider yourself very lucky. This is why so many real estate lawyers in various locations these days strongly believe every state should have a property tax measure similar to Proposition 13 transfer of property and inheriting property taxes; and Proposition 58 property transfer tax benefits. 

So if every state in the United States had a Proposition 13 and Prop 58 type of property tax relief system… and could make good use of ancillary tax breaks such as buying out inherited property shares from siblings intent on selling out — through a loan to a trust, from a specialty trust lender; using a trust loan in conjunction with Proposition 58 to permanently solidify a low property tax base, made possible by Proposition 13; given the legal right (in every state, not just California)  to avoid property tax reassessment.

Therefore, every property owner in America dealing with inherited property in trust or in an estate; perhaps also addressing sibling conflicts revolving around who wants to keep inherited property versus who insists on selling, and who can buyout whom, using a trust loan, in order to keep inherited property in the family; avoiding property tax reassessment basically forever.  Everyone with these types of sibling property conflicts or property tax issues of any kind, even just the ability to pay them – would walk away happy… and for once all estate or trust family related conflicts would wind up as a win-win inheritance scenario, every single time these property tax measures were employed.

>> Click Here for Part Three…

PART ONE: The CA Proposition 15 Split-Roll “Trojan Horse” Commercial Property Tax is Coming Up for a Vote!

California Proposition 15

The battle in California between supporters of property tax relief and critics of property tax breaks for Californians, still drags on in tedious fashion… specifically concerning  Proposition 13 (in short, the ability to transfer parents property taxes, with the right to avoid property tax reassessment; with a parent to child exclusion – capped at 2% maximum tax rate) as well as  Proposition 58 (in summary, Prop 58 helps heirs buyout sibling property while providing low rates on property tax transfers for beneficiaries, with a long-term low Prop 13 property tax base through a trust loan, while avoiding property tax reassessment at present day rates).

Critics of California property tax relief still repeat the same old talking points, like parrots, opining on the exaggerated need for cash from property taxes to “save the drowning school system from disaster; etc.”  Whereas their Proposition 15 Split-Roll property tax would in fact be the very thing that would bring about economic disaster in California. 

Split-Roll supporters even added a deceptive “exemption” from two to three million dollars in property value as a promotional trigger point, hoping that this deceptive and confusing formula will succeed in unraveling  tax breaks for owners of industrial facilities and commercial properties – which they are now calling “Proposition 15”… a safe, innocuous sounding title that is actually cloaking a rather toxic, sinister process  that would begin the slow, poisonous destruction of property tax relief in the sunny state of California.

Knowing that going after residential property tax benefits would be something like going after the popular Medicare program or the even more popular Affordable Care Act… Likewise, you don’t directly attack popular property tax benefits that millions of people love and depend on – first you start nibbling at the edges… then you work your way inward, towards destroying the center.  It looks to us like that is exactly what is going on in California right now. 

Like the Post Office nationwide, for example… if you dismantle the system internally, mail won’t be delivered on time, no matter what anyone tells you to the contrary.  Sometimes things are exactly as they seem to be!  So no matter what anyone says, after dismantling property tax breaks for commercial property owners, the next step is clearly to unravel property tax relief for home owners.  Sometimes things are exactly as they appear to be.

Once critics of property tax relief start in on affluent landlords who own business rental properties, they won’t stop until they dismantle middle class commercial property owners… and then, of course, wealthy and then middle class home owners – until every single middle class American is scraped clean!  Easy prey for them. Low hanging fruit. They call it a “wealth tax” in some states, and in California they’re calling it a “split-roll” tax. A new way to get more money from us, basically.  One way or the other.  It’s a similar ploy to ramp up and increase tax revenue they want us to pay.  It’s plain to see.

It was retired, older couples and elderly widows who were being kicked out of their homes (that they resided in for 4, 5, 6 decades), basically due to unpaid or under-paid property taxes in 1974 and 1975, 1976… before Proposition 13 was finally passed by voters in 1978, thanks to Mr. Howard Jarvis and friends, at the Taxpayers Association in California.

Now, with Proposition 15, formerly the “split-roll” tax, underway – this time it will be middle class and working class “mom & pop” shops and consumer businesses renting store-fronts and offices in leased buildings, or Uber drivers who are home owners… who will be harassed by the Tax Man, and ultimately displaced, with nowhere comfortable and safe to go!   

Wayne Lusvardi says in CaliforniaGlobe.com: “Proposition 15 – the so-called split-roll commercial and residential tax hike – on the November ballot, is being advertised as solely a commercial property tax. But there is a Trojan Horse contained in Proposition 15 that will unravel Proposition 13 property tax protections even for residential properties.

Single-family residential homes used for home offices or UBER drivers who park their cars at their owned residences will have their homes reclassified as commercial properties under proposed Proposition 15. Eventually, property taxes will be equalized by the legislature, and the mandates of Proposition 15 will apply to all owners who hold multiple homes and apartments, not just commercial properties. Moreover, small business owners will have the higher property taxes passed through to them in the form of higher rents and will not be able to stay in business after a couple of years.”

And guess who will pay the ultimate price for this so-called “split-roll” property tax? Higher commercial property taxes… Wait, let’s re-phrase that – MUCH higher commercial and industrial property taxes will ultimately be paid by the consumer. All of us.

Why?  All the services and goods you have grown to depend on will go way up in price thanks to business, industrial and commercial property taxes going up – landlords renting our store space and office buildings will have no choice but to raise their rents to survive, and subsequently their tenants, who own gas stations and super markets and stores and strip-malls, and office buildings all over California, will have to raise their prices to keep from going flat out of business within 10, 12 months. 

Moreover, this move would most likely open the door for critics of commercial and industrial property tax breaks, to eventually attack and unravel consumer property tax relief, including Proposition 58.  As we all know, Prop 58 helps heirs buyout sibling property with the use of a trust loan, while locking in a low Proposition 13 property tax base, more or less forever.

Hence, if this new property tax passes… that sound of air whooshing out of a balloon you hear will be the air whooshing out of the economy all across the once great state of California. 

>> Click Here for Part Two…

In Tune with Tough Times in California – Free Prop 58 Trust Loan Evaluation – Save Over $6,000 in Property Taxes

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Prop 58 Trust Loan

California is unique when it comes to utilizing trusts and trust loans, along with taking advantage of incomparable property tax relief measures from as Proposition 13, and exceptional property tax breaks from Proposition 58 (i.e., parental property transfer) and Proposition 193 (i.e., property transfer from grandparents). 

So if you reside in California, are inheriting property there, and want to insure you keep your parent’s low Proposition 13 tax base, along with buying out siblings who insist on selling to an outside buyer – you can go to a niche trust lender who will lend directly to an irrevocable trust for you, to accomplish all of the above.

Commercial Loan Corporation in Newport Beach, CA appears to be everyone’s favorite trust lender, as they specialize in taking full advantage of Proposition 58 & 193 property tax benefits, avoiding property tax reassessment,  making sure you transfer parents property taxes correctly, when inheriting a business facility, home and/or land; abruptly inheriting property taxes that must remain low if you wish to maintain your favored lifestyle!  

You certainly want to work with a lender that has a great deal of experience making sure that beneficiaries and property owners nail down the right to keep parents property taxes, with a low Proposition 13 tax base… for all property tax transfer scenarios, including parent to child transfer, what your attorney probably refers to as “parent to child exclusion”… In other words, exclusion from current property tax reassessment rates. And that typically adds up to saving over $6,000 every year in savings on property taxes. 

The process sounds complicated, but it really just boils down to having a lending firm you can rely on to provide enough liquidity to equalize everything between beneficiaries – providing enough cash to buyout siblings who insist on selling your inherited property; while enabling you to keep that property at a low Proposition 13 tax base.  At the end of the day, it should always be a win-win scenario for everyone involved.

Beneficiaries especially like Commercial Loan Corp’s same-day approval & 7-day funding turnaround – with no hidden fees, a simple application form and flexible underwriting. 

By taking advantage of the Proposition 58 and Prop 193 exclusion;  in tandem with a trust loan, if you happen to be a sibling keeping inherited  property – you get to retain that property and at the same time get to keep parents property taxes, which ends up being a low Proposition 13 base, capped at a 2% maximum rate.  You also get to buyout siblings who insist on selling the inherited home and/or land in question; and ultimately walk off with more money than if they had sold their property shares to an outside buyer.  So what frequently begins as sibling conflict, ends with a win-win resolution for all concerned.  

In many cases, a trust loan is necessary, as otherwise the California State Board of Equalization sees this transaction as a sibling buying out another sibling, or child of the parent. Instead of a parent to child transfer, or parent to child exclusion. The exclusion from present day property tax rate reassessment simply calls for a transfer of property from parent to child.

So the trust loan acts as the bridge, so to speak. You can refer to it  any number of different ways, such as “buying my brother’s share of our house” or “buying out my sister’s property shares”… Or you can call it a transfer of property between siblings, a buy out of siblings share of house, buying out siblings’ property shares, or a sibling to sibling property transfer.  It amounts to the same thing. 

Moreover, regardless of the size of  the trust loan, everyone involved is treated like a V.I.P. client, with first-class cordiality.  Which is the main reason we like to refer this firm.  

You can call Commercial Loan Corporation for a free Proposition 58 Trust Loan Evaluation at 877-464-1066 or visit their website at: https://cloanc.com/

 

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PART ONE: Coronavirus Crisis in California Motivating State Politicians to Push Harder for “Split-Roll” Property Tax

California Property Taxes

The Coronavirus crisis is having a profound effect on various social-economic facets in California, however we will be focusing to a large degree on the real estate market, residential and commercial property issues, and property tax relief.

Moreover, the Coronavirus Pandemic has also apparently infused new support for the Split-Roll property tax in California, to pursue what would without question (if passed) be a “Pyrrhic victory”.  For those of you who might not know what that means, it’s a victory that results in such devastation to the so-called “victor” that the outcome may as well be an actual defeat! Named after King Pyrrhus of Epirus, his army suffered irreplaceable casualties in defeating the Romans at the Battle of Heraclea, in 280 BC.

At any rate, if this misguided property tax measure wins by vote in November at the ballot, many politicians and newspaper editors falsely believe that this revision to the commercial property tax code will “raise billions of dollars for cash-strapped schools and California counties”… with no negative downside. 

Now there is where they are taking the wrong turn in the road.  They even have California Secretary of State Alex Padilla drinking the Cool-Aid, and  taking a stand as primary cheerleader for this tax on middle class small business property owners, modest landlords, and so on. 

Yes, some large cash-rich corporations and wealthy business property owners and landlords will be impacted, of course.  But the critics of Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 tax relief still are continuously attempting to convince  all of us that everyone affected by a business or commercial property tax will be super rich, and therefore it won’t really matter.  

Not so. Not even close to being so.  Sure, a Split-Roll property tax will affect some wealthy commercial property owners… but many  commercial properties are owned by middle class landlords, or even upper middle class commercial property owners basically leveraged to the hilt.  But wealthy?  No.  

In fact, many of these property owners and landlords are just “getting by” – and a property tax like the one these anti property tax relief politicos and newspaper editors want to impose on commercial property owners with the falsely named “Proposition 13” property tax (“coincidentally” with the same title as the 1978  genuine Proposition 13 tax relief measure… simply to confuse voters) would surely serve to destroy hundreds if not thousands of these modest or small business property owners.  With the end result being widespread foreclosure and bankruptcy, obviously.

Not to mention business tenants having to deal with increased rents they will no longer be able to afford… and so all of these goods and services from one end of California to the other will increase virtually overnight!  And we’ll discuss these disastrous side effects later on in this six-part article.

Interestingly enough, none of these critics of the authentic 1978 Proposition 13 tax relief measure acknowledge that any of these negative and dangerous outcomes are a realistic possibility.  They dance around the fact that small businesses and most landlords  in California will not be able to absorb immediate rent increases due to property tax reassessment. 

On the other hand, if small businesses in California aren’t able to raise prices – they will most likely be forced to cut internal costs, which will include cutting employee compensation and benefits, and/or laying off employees.  So we’ll have even more people out of work.  And some of these small businesses, and perhaps larger businesses as well, will have to relocate, or worse case scenario will go completely out of business – creating an oversupply of commercial space AND higher vacancy rates, which would cause commercial property rents and values to actually decline.  Yet another hidden problem. 

This will end up decreasing  job opportunities in California, due to decreased economic activity overall throughout the state. 

This is the guaranteed downside of the Split-Roll tax that, believe it or not, Secretary of State Padilla and other political critics of property tax relief in California are not looking at.  They would do well to start looking… or they are going to step into a disastrous quagmire of their own making, if this property tax actually passes in November. 

Another key point to consider, while we’re on the subject.  Even though politicians on the state and local level claim that a “revised  Prop 13 with Split-Roll tax” includes “a small-business exemption” – it would be advisable to not buy into these vague promises from local politicians whose word is highly suspect at best!  A suspect Split-Roll tax with a reassessment exemption that is highly questionable is only for the most naive of us to believe. 

A Split-Roll tax, supposedly only imposed on commercial property owners in California will be deeply crippling for many if  not all businesses and commercial entities that own business property in California.  The revised property tax measure supposedly expands the “reassessment exemption” to small business owners with property valued at $3 million or less, up from the initial $2 million threshold.  Frankly, this sounds like double-talk to most of us.

One of “us” being Rob Gutierrez,  President of California Taxpayers Association. Mr. Gutierrez says these supposed “protections” for small businesses, a Split-Roll tax with a reassessment exemption that isn’t even close to being strong enough to allow these business owners to survive… with thousands of jobs that would have been for Californians, down the drain!  More people on the Unemployment  Line.  A Split-Roll tax with a reassessment exemption, that is basically worthless. Next, when we’re not looking, they’ll target consumer property tax relief, as well as Prop 13, avoiding property tax reassessment; and Proposition   58 property transfer tax breaks and trust loan tax benefits from trust lenders… That’s their playbook.

“Because so many small businesses rent as opposed to own their commercial space… higher property taxes on the buildings they rent space in will of course result in more expensive rent for them”, Mr. Gutierrez says… “What that translates into is higher prices for consumers and brick-and-mortar stores.  Dry cleaners, grocers, companies that cannot move, will have to find a way to pass these costs on, plus lay workers off…” 

And as usual, who does this get passed on to?  All of us.  The consumers.

>> Click Here: to Continue to Part Two…

PART TWO: 100% Secure Trust Loan Distribution Equalizing Solution

Lending to Irrevocable Trusts in California

Improving Your Family’s Security With Low Property Taxes

When families in California are going through an estate and/or probate scenario, are inheriting property, and are unfortunately  experiencing conflicts between beneficiaries who wish to retain their inherited property, and siblings who want to sell their property shares – frequently, a loan to an irrevocable trust, and a trust lender you can depend on to be reliable and affordable is the answer.

Many property owners can also be qualified to apply and keep a significantly lower tax rate to a secondary dwelling as well, if over 55 and retaining the initial inherited property for 2 years or longer.

Steps, rules & regs for the trust loan process – in conjunction with California Proposition 58 – are typically as follows:

1. Determination of who will keep the property
2. Determination of the loan amount
3. Loan to trust/estate is implemented
4. Trust lender equalizes cash distribution to beneficiary or beneficiaries
5. Property is transferred into the acquiring beneficiaries name
6. Parent child exclusion is filed, avoiding property tax reassessment
7. Five to seven day funding turnaround
8. The trust loan is repaid, concluding a win-win family arrangement
9. No Up-Front Costs
10. No Hidden Fees

An Alternative Financial Solution for Beneficiaries:

The Miller family in Southern California urgently needed a $320,000  trust loan to equalize distribution involving an inherited house valued at $615,000. They were very concerned about tax savings as well as keeping the home they have been living in for the past 10 years. Their family attorney referred the Millers, totaling four siblings, to the Newport Beach trust lender Commercial Loan Corporation.

Their inherited home was valued at $615,000, and the two beneficiaries who were interested in selling the property to an outside buyer were to be bought out to the tune of $205,000 each with the cash from a trust loan, instead of selling to a buyer, with the other two siblings losing the beloved home the family was attached to for sentimental reasons.

If the property was to be sold to a third party buyer and their property taxes reassessed normally, their estimated property taxes at current value (1.1%) would have been $6,765. If the one beneficiary was bought out by the trust loan, allowing the other three siblings to retain the home, estimated taxes were to be $4,164. An estimated property tax savings of $2,601 per year. Looking at this realistically, their income before income tax would be somewhat higher than that figure, to come up with $4,164 in cash every year to pay off those property taxes. It would have been a significant sum for a normal middle class family.

The situation was apparently very difficult in terms of getting everyone on the same page, agreeing to all the numbers. Sibling squabbling had gotten heated over the months they had spent dealing with house issues, and the in-fighting became so
intense that both beneficiaries looking to sell out actually hired separate attorneys to represent their interests. It got to the point where the family spent more time arguing on a daily basis, than doing anything else.

According to an account rep who is particularly experienced with loans to irrevocable trusts, Miss Alonso, the family arguments began to dominate all of their time together. It seemed impossible for them to agree on anything. There was also conflict between the two beneficiaries looking to keep the property. Both agreed to the process of transferring property and buying out beneficiary shares, however disagreed on what values to use. Each thought the other was attempting to trick or fool the other.

It began to look unworkable. Some of the siblings even threatened to take the matter to court of there could be no agreement on the numbers involved.

Yet, in the final analysis, the one issue that prompted the call to a trust lender that furnishes loans to irrevocable trusts, Commercial Loan Corp, and bound a thread between them all was their genuine desire to continue living in the home they had resided in prior to their parents’ passing away. In the end, this particular desire to stay on in the house was even more important to this family than the numbers and interest in saving on property taxes!

It took some time to finally normalize the situation and get all these family members on board with numbers they could all agree upon. However, the account rep, Miss Alonso, was able to eventually get everyone to the table, and to agree on the final numbers.

Everyone ended up happy with the deal, and with their tax savings looking ahead towards their projected property tax realities. Bottom line, it would have cost $36,900 to go through with a sale of the property in question. And only cost $11,919 if the family decided to simply retain the property as is.

Additionally, the trust received an extra $24, 981 in cash by keeping the property, and agreeing not to sell. All the way around, their decision to enlist the help of a firm experienced with loans to irrevocable trusts, and to keep the home of their beloved parents for sentimental reasons, ended up, ironically, being a far more sensible decision for the entire family group financially.

To reach Commercial Loan Corporation regarding assistance with a loan to an irrevocable trust, call 877-464-1066.