California Proposition 58 & Proposition 19 Lenders

California Proposition 58 and Proposition 19 Lenders

California Proposition 58 and Proposition 19 Lenders

We all know it’s a period of time right now in America of great uncertainty, insecurity and stress… affecting many families, creating enormous tensions, frequently financial…  Even affecting family estates, when a parent passes away; and where ‘will contests’ can be a real problem for families – for example, sibling-A believing she/he should be getting more than sibling-B;  so on and so forth.  We see a lot more of this sort of family conflict lately, over the past few  years, than ever before.

Although we do, thankfully, have solutions in California to prevent such conflicts from descending into disaster. Some of these solutions are tied into getting approved for CA Proposition 58 so heirs can avoid property tax reassessment; as well as classic CA Proposition 13 property tax breaks, for California property owners looking to work around new Proposition 19 property tax obstacles that force homeowners to move into inherited property within one year or lose their “Parent to Child Exclusion”. This can be a stunning loss of property tax relief; unless we meet it head on, and are able to  successfully work around it. 

It seems it’s still possible to take advantage of the property tax transfer benefit from parents, with the ability to keep parents property taxes while avoiding property tax reassessment of course. Despite newly passed obstacles, we can still transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property – bottom line, inheriting parents property taxes at a low base rate the way Proposition 13 was intended!  

Firms like Commercial Loan Corp can help solve estate conflicts between beneficiaries; making it possible for us to buyout siblings with a “sibling to sibling property transfer”, siblings who want to sell their inherited property shares, while allowing us to keep the same mutually inherited property from parents – with a trust loan, at that low base rate.  As long as we get approved for Proposition  58, heirs can avoid property tax reassessment, as the California State Board of Equalization explains.  Or possibly at a niche property tax info blog like this one, Property Tax Transfer

As long as everyone gets the cash they were expecting with a trust loan, and/or end up with a nice low property tax base… everyone ends up in a win-win happy sibling scenario. As long as the ‘will contest’ can be resolved to some degree, and direct communications between siblings doesn’t completely fall part.

These conflicts have often dominated family structures, so much so that some family groups actually splinter apart… with some family members literally leaving California for ever.  Additionally, Southern California home prices are currently at record levels, which doesn’t help. 

Because of hyper expensive home pricing many people are moving from California to nearby states where cheaper real estate can be found, in decent middle class or lower middle class neighborhoods; including Texas, Nevada, Arizona, and in some cases Oregon and Washington, according to Jordan Levine, an economist at the CA Association of Realtors (C.A.R.), who says California residents leave to get out from under general California inflation and an increasingly expensive overall lifestyle that many middle class families simply cannot afford to sustain – in terms of buying a home, feeding a family, maintaining numerous cars and insurance plans, health coverage expenses; schools; you name it. 

It is ironic that C.A.R. (California Association of Realtors) produces a report describing elevated living expenses in the state of California, while they are in fact the chief sponsor supporting the recent Proposition 19 property tax measure, watering down  property tax relief for California home owners… contributing to the higher cost of living in the state… Obstructing the way heirs can avoid property tax reassessment by unraveling the “Parent to Child Exclusion” or Parent-to-Child Exemption, as realtors like to call it.

As a matter of fact, this past August, the median home price in California was up more than 12% from a year earlier, according to CoreLogic/DQNews. Experts say the median home price is being impacted by an increase in luxury homes along with the flexibility of remote working options, which also allows people to move away from places like Los Angeles or San Francisco, to nearby states, in rural areas where families can get more space and amenities for far less cost than in many populated areas in California.

California real estate is often significantly more expensive than other, nearby, states. But then again, so is property in states like New York, or Chicago, in Oregon,  Maryland or Massachusetts. However. At least in California, homeowners and beneficiaries inheriting property have been fortunate enough to have property tax breaks at their disposal since 1978 such as Proposition 13, maintaining a low property tax cap of 1% to 2 % max.

Moreover, since 1986 Proposition 58 has positively impacted property transfers and naturally property tax transfer, avoiding property tax reassessment on inherited property while inheriting property taxes from parents.  This  has actually saved homeowners in California tens of thousands of dollars over the years.  Hundreds of thousands, literally, over decades.

In fact, thanks to Proposition 58, trust loan based estate funding transactions save beneficiaries $6,000 to $8,000 or more on average, per family, every year.  No, it’s not millions… But for a regular middle class family it is definitely significant.   And if homeowners can’t access this type of benefit, it will hurt them financially year after year.

So even if we can buy a house more cheaply in a relatively inexpensive state like Ohio, or Idaho, South Dakota, North Carolina, or Wisconsin, for example… All comparatively less pricey than average property in many areas in California — we end up spending more anyway every year in property taxes in those other states. So we end up spending more every year anyway.

Property tax transfer, known as a parent to child transfer or parent to child exemption, will always be low, at 2% or less – if we continue to be able to avoid property tax reassessment.  With new property tax laws in place, if we miss that 12-month deadline to move into inherited property – then we’re right back in the financial vice known as “current market value”…

And, bless the California politicos who negotiated for us against the Legislature to at least retain enough of Proposition 58 so as long as we do get in under the wire, within that first 12-months after our decedent passes away… with 6-figure trust loan approval, we can, as beneficiaries, buy out co-beneficiaries’ shares of inherited property, which realtors call “sibling to sibling property transfer”, or ”transfer of property between siblings” and end up owning our own property anyway, without the problem of sharing real estate with siblings we’d rather not own property with.

Thankfully, although the timeline has now become more challenging, we can, as California inheritors and homeowners, still take advantage of tax breaks made possible by Proposition 58 and Proposition 13, in concert with an irrevocable trust — and buyout siblings,  so we can take over our own home at a nice low property tax base, more or less equivalent to the tax base enjoyed by our parents. Property tax relief in California may be a bit rocky right now… but it’s still there, if we use it carefully and judiciously.  And keep both eyes on that calendar!

Loans for Irrevocable Trusts

Loans for homes in an irrevocable trust

Loans for homes in an irrevocable trust

According to financial leaders who own firms that provide loans for irrevocable trusts and property tax relief programs, in concert with Proposition 58, Prop 193, and Proposition 13 – typically saving  homeowners over $8,500 in extra taxes every year – the news is that property owners in California should consider accomplishing any property transfers to heirs, that may be planned either as a sale, a gift or an inheritance, or a hybrid – prior to or by Feb. 15, 2021…

Feb. 15th being the final day one can access original Proposition 58 or Prop 193 property tax break benefits – to save money on the initial transfer, plus thousands of dollars on yearly property taxes, as the tax assessor comes around to collect, so to speak.  

To reiterate, as you probably already know, Proposition 58 allows parents in California to transfer property to their children without triggering a property tax reassessment. And as you most likely are aware, you must be the son or daughter of a parent that resides, and owns property, in California – in order to qualify for a “parent to child exclusion” (also referred to as a parent to child exemption) – from reassessment, in terms of the current market value of family owned real property.

Conversely, Proposition 193 allows grandparents to transfer property to their grandchildren, with a “grandparent to grandchild exemption” – without having to worry about current market property tax reassessment.  It’s worth noting that the Proposition 193 exclusion is workable only if the Proposition 58 exemption cannot be used.  In other words, to put it bluntly, parents of the grandchildren in question must be deceased.  That may sound harsh, however it is important to know the facts.

To be safe and secure, experts are telling us right now to be aware of certain changes to the Proposition 58 “parent to child exclusion” tax break – and to remain aware of time as a serious factor. We are told that we should view Feb. 15, 2021 as a formal deadline for completing a family property transfer or intra-family trust for a trust loan – not for paperwork signatures, or a postmark date. With potential county closures mounting up, the completion of this sort of transaction in person could very well continue to be a challenge, and backlogs affecting paperwork sent through the mail could be an issue at some point.  

As of February 16, 2021, family property transfers must be used as a primary residence, to avoid property tax reassessment at current market value; maintaining the invaluable right to avoid property tax reassessment.  Fortunately, Californians will still be able to take advantage of a property tax break as long as they are using inherited property as a primary residence, within a year of the passing of the decedent who is leaving the property to his or her children; typically as an inheritance.    

However, we do need to be aware that it is the next generation of property owners, in the future, that may incur higher property taxes due to new tax laws, or shall we say a revised version of the same   property tax break protected by CA Proposition 58.  The point being, with new changes to property tax law in California, with the right to avoid property tax reassessment being challenged and even partially unraveled, it has  become more important than ever to consult or work with Prop 58 and property tax relief experts that are knowledgeable in all trust loan, Proposition 58 and Proposition 13 matters… who maintain a grasp of property tax law changes, and how those shifts impact beneficiaries and property owners in the state of California.    

Home ownership for middle class Americans has mushroomed and developed at a breakneck pace, as the gold centerpiece that represents The American Dream…. Yet it is property tax breaks, and property tax relief for the middle class in the state of California – that has kept that dream alive.

Part Two: Your Source for Timely, Accurate News and Info on Trusts & Estates, for California Proposition 13 & Proposition 58

Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfer

Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfer

Let’s take a quick look at the actual state tax data in the great state of California…  Overall revenue going to local government entities from property taxes throughout California was nearly $5.0 billion in 1978 to 1979… and by 2010 to 2011 real estate tax revenue was at $49 billion per year! An increase that is two and a half times the rate of inflation over the same period, furnishing California local government entities with a very robust stream of real property tax revenue.

On the human side, away from the economics of the issue, folks in California, prior to Proposition 13, before 1978, were seeing elderly neighbors, friends and senior relatives, inheriting property taxes in CA… being forced from their homes as egregious real property tax increases spiraled out of control — and in some areas literally doubled from one year to the next — as older friends and beloved elderly relatives living right next door on fixed incomes, could not meet these unfair tax increases and were cruelly pushed out of homes they had been living in, and raised families in, for over 40 years. neighbors were being forced from their homes.

After Proposition 13 was voted into law, Californians saw right away the benefits of a tax system that would limit annual tax increases to 1% to 2% max, and began to provided a stable system for everyone in California – from government agencies that depend on property taxes, to people like seniors and other various middle class home owners… turning what had become a dreaded system of out of control real property taxes – into a fair, predictable tax system year to year – no longer a financial nightmare for those who happened not to be wealthy, living on modest or fixed incomes.

And of course in 1986 Proposition 58 was passed in California, making Proposition 13 all the more critical and invaluable…  smoothing out property transfer from parent to child into a formal transaction; middle class people  inheriting property taxes in CA now had the ability to avoid property tax reassessment at present-day rates, with the right to keep parents property taxes intact. Naturally, this was a major advancement for Californians, in terms of tax relief.  Not only for residential and commercial property owners – but for renters all across the state as well, since rents remained reasonable as long as landlords were not besieged by increased property taxes.

Nonetheless, those opposing this most popular tax solution called Prop 13 by Californians, still continue dragging the same old tired arguments through the gutters and broken down political avenues used by real estate executives, politicians and newspaper editors to put forth their old, discredited arguments in Op-Eds and widely debunked opinions in Editorials, in the few newspapers that will allow them the space to air out their opinions — despite the fact that everyone knows most Californians favor Proposition 13 & 58.  The critics are tone deaf.

We present these issues objectively in this go-to free resource blog for people interested in Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 property transfers…. For those keenly interested in learning more about how to avoid property tax reassessment, and how to keep parents’ 1% to 2% property tax limits safely in place in California, out of the reach of irrational opponents…

For those of us who want to know more about parent to child transfer and parent to child exclusion; about trust distribution loans, avoiding property tax reassessment, proposition 13 transfer, how to keep parents property taxes… and how to effectively transfer parents property taxes. And for property owners who wish to educate themselves further on the subject of inheriting property taxes, property tax transfer, real property tax transfer or real estate tax transfer.

If these interests, and additionally related topics, describe you – then you’re in the right place. We welcome your opinions and comments, and we’ll add your text comments or audio/video commentary, if you have something new, valuable, or unique to add to the discourse here.

PART TWO: California Proposition 58 and Loans to Trusts ~ Featuring Noted Trust Loan Expert Tanis Alonso from Commercial Loan Corp.

Loans to Irrevocable Trusts for Proposition 58

California Loans to Irrevocable Trusts for Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfers

Our Interview with noted Commercial Loan Corp. Trust Loan and Proposition 58 specialist Tanis Alonso continues…

Property Tax Transfer:  Tanis, let me ask you…  Beneficiaries that call your company, desperate to keep parents property taxes;  for any solution to their property transfer / Proposition 58 issue – is it a safe bet to assume that 99% of the time there are elements that come up again and again?

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): Well, that’s true, to a point. With beneficiaries that call us, with a trust or estate situation, there is always real property being inherited, going to one or several beneficiaries… and little, if any, cash – and each family always has different dynamics. There are always differences, as regards the people and details involved. But, the one constant you can be sure of is that there is always someone who wants to sell… and always someone who wants to keep the property they are inheriting… dead set against selling.

Property Tax Transfer: And at the end of the tunnel, is it safe to assume that with your company it’s generally a win-win equation, for everyone involved. Everyone involved, more or less, get what they want, right?

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): That’s right.  99% of the time. The beneficiary, or beneficiaries, that want cash from the sale of the property that they’re inheriting, get the cash they were looking for, from the trust loan…

Property Tax Transfer: And the beneficiary or beneficiaries that want to keep the house, get to keep that house, and keep parents property taxes…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): Yes! And let me say that, typically, this is a really, really big win for them – as the siblings that wanted to sell are usually very vocal, and very aggressive about their desire to do so! That beneficiary that wants to keep that property, that is also able to get the other siblings a large amount of cash for their shares in the inherited real estate – while still being able to keep the home they’re so attached to, and keep parents property taxes; keeping parents property tax rate.  This would be practically impossible, were it not for our trust loan. And there’s your win-win equation!

Property Tax Transfer: And what about the cost factor? Costs involved in the equation… How does everyone benefit on that level, getting cash to the beneficiaries that wanted cash from a house sale? Versus coming up with property buyout cash themselves…
       
Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): OK, so cost involved, selling versus keeping inherited property. I’ll try to keep the equation simple. Costs associated with this property funding process through a trust loan, paying for everything, including beneficiary property shares buyout, taxes, etc. is, on average, 3.5% – So by someone keeping the family property everyone will receive more money than if they were to sell the property at approximately 6.5% in costs. The average trust receives $45,716 more to distribute than if they were to sell the property to some random buyer.  Each beneficiary on average is receiving $16,652 more by someone keeping the property, instead of selling it. And our average annual tax savings is $6,043. We have already saved a combined amount just shy of 1 million dollars for our clients on property taxes. That is a significant benefit for all beneficiaries when someone keeps the property instead of selling it! 

PropertyTax Transfer: So you’re saying those savings would have been completely lost, per beneficiary, if they had sold out to a regular buyer…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): That’s right. For example, say it’s you and your sister.  A major conflict. You want to keep the house you’re all inheriting from your parents, plus keep parents property taxes. Why should I let my sister sell? The solution there is because you are going to get more cash in your hands than if you were to sell the property! That’s the bottom line. A trust loan transaction takes 7-10 business days whereas selling will take a few months. Everyone receives more money, more rapidly, then if they were to sell the property on the open market. Everyone benefits from this… it’s win-win all the way around.

PropertyTaxTransfer: So you let your sister sell, so everyone wins – is what you’re saying.

Tanis Alonso: Of course! Let her sell, let her get her way – and you end up getting your way… you get what you wanted, to keep your house with everyone paid off and happy. No more conflict. On a $500,000 property – do you want to spend 6.5% to sell that property, with a realtor, or 3.5% through our trust loan, in keeping with the Proposition 58 tax system? Which number would you want to give away, 6.5% or 3.5%? 

Property Tax Transfer: Naturally. So the long range picture looks like increases in taxes as well, so that’s not as affordable either.

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): Absolutely right. In certain cases a property tax reassessment can add an extra $700 to $1000 per month to your property taxes. That’s an extra $1,000 per month – not per year! Month after month. That is affordability vs not affordability to many. 

Property Tax Transfer: Going through the Proposition 58 tax system, with the trust loan paying everyone off…  What would property taxes look like going down that road?

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): OK so the question is, “why do I need a trust loan to buy out beneficiaries who want to sell our inherited house?”  The answer is you can still keep the house you’re inheriting, and not spend any of your own money in the process.  The importance of the trust loan is that you can buy out your siblings and still keep parents property taxes. You keep 100% of the low Proposition 13 property tax base that was originally paid by your parents.  If you were to use your own money to buy out your siblings, the State Board of Equalization would see that as a sibling buying out a sibling – and that would definitely trigger a property tax reassessment. Naturally, the result of that would be higher taxes.  So you need the trust loan to buy out your siblings in order to take advantage of Proposition 58, and keep the low property tax base. 

Property Tax Transfer: Most people don’t have that kind of cash on hand nor do they want to use all of their cash for this just to buy out beneficiaries in an estate setting. Especially if the numbers go higher…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation):  Beneficiaries who want to keep their inherited property still put a lot more money in their pocket, still save a lot more,  by not using their own funds…  by buying out beneficiaries that want to sell by going the trust loan route.  Staying within the discounted Proposition 13 tax base, being able to keep parents property taxes … taking advantage of the  Proposition 58 property tax system, or tax shelter.  Using this tax shelter  that we looked at before, if you recall – would be around $1,200 per year on a million dollar property.  Saving thousands of dollars annually on property taxes by taking advantage of Proposition 58; keeping their parents low property tax base. 

Property Tax Transfer: Yes, the difference in the numbers are stunning.

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation):  Yes it is.  So if you use your own money to buy out your siblings you will trigger a reassessment… if that was reassessed normally, without doing the property transfer and beneficiary payoff with our trust loan – you’d be looking at an $11,000 tax hit per year on the same million dollar property!  If reassessed at the current, present day, base rate – that tax hit goes up 10 times. A significant difference in cash back in your pocket after it’s all done and said. Trust loans are a huge benefit for all of these families and that’s how we’re able to really help people in a significant way.  

Property Tax Transfer: The amount of money saved really is remarkable.  And I can see that you genuinely enjoy helping your clients save a great deal of money with these trust loans. Making great use of the low Proposition 13 base rate, and the Proposition 58 property transfer tax shelter… The formula works!

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. And helping people in this way is what it’s all about! That entire viewpoint is the basis for this whole company, from the top down – starting with the CEO, who is a truly terrific guy, who genuinely loves helping people, with money, memories, and time. And you can’t replace memories and time!

Property Tax Transfer:  You can’t replace memories and time… Very well put!  That is a concept to remember.

Tanis Alonso: It is so important to remember, when you truly care about what happens to the people you’re helping.

Property Tax Transfer: Very true.  Your clients are lucky to have you folks working for them.  Thanks so much for speaking with us today.

Tanis Alonso: Thank you.  It was a great pleasure chatting with you.

PART ONE: California Proposition 58 and Loans to Trusts – Featuring Noted Trust Loan Expert Tanis Alonso from Commercial Loan Corp.

Loans to Trusts for Proposition 58

Loans to Trusts for Proposition 58

We sat in with noted Proposition 58, trust loan expert – Tanis Alonso, at Commercial Loan Corporation in Southern California.  Tanis has a uniquely profound, global understanding of the entire trust loan process; and applies a very human, not simply financial, viewpoint to the process ~ as does the entire team at the cloanc.com organization; with a strong, genuine focus on “helping people” not simply implementing financial transactions…

Property Tax Transfer: Thank you so much for agreeing to chat with us about Proposition 58 and trust loans today…

Tanis Alonso: Of course. It’s my pleasure.

Property Tax Transfer: Great. Tanis, can we take a close look at how the basic trust loan process works in California, from your perspective, as a lender – and from the point of view of your average everyday beneficiary, many who need to keep parents property taxes…  Some who want to sell a property they are inheriting from their parents – and of course the other beneficiaries to a trust or estate that are determined to keep that home, and fight that sale. But first, who is your typical caller? Who in the estate or trust scenario tends to reach out to you first?

Tanis Alonso: Basically, whomever is trying to not sell the inherited property – is generally the initial caller to my office. It might be the trustee, frequently at odds with certain beneficiaries… Or very often it’s a family member, one of the beneficiary’s to the trust that doesn’t want to sell that home.

Property Tax Transfer: Got it. So, what does an average Proposition 58 property transfer and trust loan scenario in California look like, contributing to peace of mind for property owners? There must be similar scenarios, that reflect average  trust or estate outcomes all across the state.

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. One of the most common scenarios we see, here at Commercial Loan Corp., are elderly parents, for example… who, sadly, pass away, leaving loved ones behind. So, let’s say there is an estate, or perhaps a trust, and there are three beneficiaries involved… And property is the only asset… Let’s say there are no cash accounts. And this is not uncommon these days.

Property Tax Transfer: Yes, we hear that it’s quite common to see a trust inheritance, or probate estate, where there is very little cash left at the end of the road…

Tanis Alonso: Exactly. Parents who pass away in their nineties let’s say, who basically have spent most of their cash assets that were in savings, or in stocks and bonds, and by the time they get into their mid or late nineties, those assets are mostly gone, cashed out or spent –

Property Tax Transfer: You mean, simply spent on living… no frills, no traveling around the world, staying in fancy hotels, eating out in 5-star restaurants…

Tanis Alonso: Oh no, nothing fancy… just simple day to day living. Food, rent, medical expenses – normal expenses that eat up plenty of cash.

Property Tax Transfer: Certainly. Medical expenses can eat up an entire estate… and leave a house, and that’s all that is left in so many trusts, in so many estates, left by decedents. At least it’s usually paid for.

Tanis Alonso: Yes, many older homes being inherited by beneficiaries in these scenarios are not carrying any debt. Which is fortunate. So let’s say in many of these middle class or even upper middle class families there is a house, maybe some land, and possibly a few valuables…

Property Tax Transfer: OK. So there isn’t much money left in many inheritances… So what do beneficiaries do? When do these conflicts we hear so much about begin, when a house is being inherited by several beneficiaries… some who wish to sell, and some who prefer to keep the property, and to keep parents property taxes?

Tanis Alonso: Well, here is a typical middle class inherited real estate scenario – let’s say, for example, there are three beneficiaries and no other assets being inherited except an older home. One beneficiary wants to keep the house, to keep parents property taxes; while the other two siblings prefer to get cash from an immediate house sale, probably through a nearby realtor. But – instead of selling to a buyer, here is where Proposition 58 and a trust loan comes into play, providing liquidity and compliance with the Proposition 58 tax system – furnishing the two siblings who prefer to sell, with enough cash liquidity as if they had sold their shares in the inherited property to a buyer…

Property Tax Transfer: So why not sell? Why the trust loan?

Tanis Alonso: Because with a loan to a trust there is the upside of less expense. Frequently, we’re talking about ten times less of an expense than would normally be involved in a house sale. Again, a process compensating beneficiaries through a trust loan, instead of a house sale or coming up with the cash yourself… versus a formal house sale through a realtor that would cost approximately ten times the amount to process the entire scenario, a house sale, with realtor commission and fees, taxes, ancillary costs, etc…

Property Tax Transfer: Paying off the beneficiaries who wanted the cash from a house sale in the first place, right?

Tanis Alonso: Exactly. And so the rest of the trust loan goes to pay for 100% of parents Proposition 13 tax base – and the Proposition 58 tax system makes it possible to transfer the property to the beneficiary or beneficiaries that did not want to sell – to keep parents property taxes at the low Proposition 13 tax rate – or involving Proposition 193 if it is real property,  not left by the parents, but by grandparents.  

Property Tax Transfer: You say ten times less on expenses versus paying for it yourself?

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. It costs the families we help far less to get a trust loan from us, believe it or not, then it does if they were to dig into their own savings to complete the Proposition 58 property transfer process.

Property Tax Transfer: How does that translate in terms of real numbers?

Tanis Alonso:  Let’s say a property value is currently one million dollars and the current tax base is $1,200. If they were to get reassessed at current value that would be around $11,000 annually.  By someone keeping the property and obtaining a trust loan to properly buy out their siblings that allows the beneficiary that is keeping the property to keep parents property taxes, to retain 100% of the Proposition 13 tax base that was paid by their parents and keep that low property tax base of $1,200. This of course creates much greater affordability than if they were to improperly buy out their siblings and have that property reassessed. The loan to trust goes hand in hand with the Proposition 58 property tax transfer system, creating enough liquidity to equalize distributions, not sell, and allow a beneficiary to keep their parents property with their low property tax base. 

Property Tax Transfer: It sounds counter intuitive, doesn’t it.

Tanis Alonso: I know, it does sound counter intuitive – yet it’s true. All you have to do is run the numbers yourself, and you’ll see what I’m talking about. It’s a better way to be able to keep an inherited house in the family, and to keep parents property taxes, when there is a dispute going on that pits the beneficiary who wants to keep a house against the beneficiaries that want to sell that home. A home that a family has so many memories associated with; with such strong emotional attachments to. There are so many wonderful family memories that are attached to each home. And every home is unique and different in that sense, just as every family member is different and unique.

Property Tax Transfer: You mean emotional memories you can’t replace with cash, in fact you can’t buy for any amount of money.

Tanis Alonso: That’s right. Anyway, this process allows families to keep that home in the family. And that’s the most important point!

Property Tax Transfer: It is the crucial point.

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. And as a person on the front lines for this firm, neither I or Commercial Loan Corp. view each trust loan scenario as simply a “financial transaction”. Nor do we see the home they’ve lived in for decades as just a “piece of real property”. To us, this a “piece of family history” in the making. And the process a family decision, not a “transaction”. We see our clients as real families that we’re helping, financially and emotionally, not just as clients signing a contract for a trust loan. For us it’s much more than that.

Property Tax Transfer: It’s very obvious that you really enjoy helping people… getting them money when they really need it – and saving them on the cost side in the bargain, with trust loans.

Tanis Alonso: Correct. We see them as real people that we’re able to help in a time of need. For us it’s so much more than cash and property – we don’t view it that way. We’re talking about family history here. Not just “another deal”.

Continued in Part Two…

Your Source for Timely, Accurate News and Information on Trusts & Estates, for California Proposition 13 and Prop 58

Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfer

Proposition 58 Property Tax Transfer

Most Californians favor Proposition 13 & 58. And it’s worth pointing out that California Proposition 13, also called The People’s Initiative to Limit Property Taxation, voted into law as an amendment of the Constitution of California – is, after 42 years, even more popular today as it was when Californians voted it into law on June 6, 1978. (Interestingly enough, the same date memorializing the Normandy landings, D-Day on June 6, back in 1944.)

As a matter of fact, CA Proposition 13 was championed early on, and driven successfully through numerous political  obstacles, by the famous Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association… whose  courageous and inspired CEO, Mr. Jon Coupal, took over the Chief Executive reigns in 1999, and is largely responsible for leading the charge for accelerated property tax relief in California… right up to the present.

With financial analysts now telling us that Proposition 13 has saved California taxpayers over $528 billion saving the average middle class California family more than $60,000 to-date… and counting – it’s no wonder at all that most Californians favor Proposition 13 & 58!  In fact, as Mr. Coupal and his Taxpayers Association tells us, Prop 13 has made everyone’s property tax in California more reasonable.  Click here to learn more more…

Yet even though a majority of home owners in California still support Proposition 13, and Proposition 58 – which has, since 1986, enabled home owners to transfer real property from parent to child, and vice versa, without beneficiaries being reassessed for present day tax rate increases, discussed here, in various posts, within this blog. Or, click here for more info and Q & A on Proposition 58 (and 193)… there is still a stubborn minority that opposes it… such as special interest politicos in the pocket of certain powerful people in the real estate business or public employee union bosses, some independent realtors, several ill-informed academics, and a few mainstream newspapers like the SF Chronicle and LA Times with an interest in big-bucks real estate advertising.

Generally, the opponents of Proposition 13, and Proposition 58 home transfers avoiding property tax reassessment… typically are after more cash from tax payers in California, especially some folks in the real estate business, and are still laboring under the long-held, dragged through the mud misconception that there would be more cash coming into the real estate business, and into state coffers, were it not for the lack of present-day real property value reassessment associated with Proposition 13 and Prop 58… directly affecting California tax revenue. Even though accurate data shows us that the California state government benefits from Proposition 13 just as much as tax-paying homeowners do from the lack of tax reassessment, allowing them to never pay more than a 2% increase in property taxes.

Let’s take a quick look at the actual state tax data. Overall revenue going to local government entities from property taxes throughout California was nearly $5.0 billion in 1978 to 1979… and by 2010 to 2011 real estate tax revenue was at $49 billion per year! An increase that is two and a half times the rate of inflation over the same period, furnishing California local government entities with a very robust stream of real property tax revenue.

On the human side, away from the economics of the issue, folks in California, prior to Proposition 13, before 1978, were seeing elderly neighbors, friends and senior relatives, being forced from their homes as egregious real property tax increases spiraled out of control — and in some areas literally doubled from one year to the next — as older friends and beloved elderly relatives living right next door on fixed incomes, could not meet these unfair tax increases and were cruelly pushed out of homes they had been living in, and raised families in, for over 40 years. neighbors were being forced from their homes.

After Proposition 13 was voted into law, Californians saw right away the benefits of a tax system that would limit annual tax increases to 1% to 2% max, and began to provided a stable system for everyone in California – from government agencies that depend on property taxes, to people like seniors and other various middle class home owners… turning what had become a dreaded system of out of control real property taxes – into a fair, predictable tax system year to year – no longer a financial nightmare for those who happened not to be wealthy, living on modest or fixed incomes.

Nonetheless, those opposing this most popular tax solution called Prop 13 by Californians, still continue dragging the same old tired arguments through the gutters and broken down political avenues used by real estate executives, politicians and newspaper editors to put forth their old, discredited arguments in Op-Eds and widely debunked opinions in Editorials, in the few newspapers that will allow them the space to air out their opinions — despite the fact that everyone knows most Californians favor Proposition 13 & 58.  The critics are tone deaf.

We present these issues objectively in this go-to free resource blog for people interested in Proposition 13 and Proposition 58 property transfers…. For those keenly interested in learning more about how to avoid property tax reassessment, and how to keep parents’ 1% to 2% property tax limits safely in place in California, out of the reach of irrational opponents… For those of us who want to know more about parent to child transfer and parent to child exclusion; about trust distribution loans, avoiding property tax reassessment, proposition 13 transfer, and how to keep parents property taxes and how to effectively transfer parents property taxes. And for those home owners who wish to educate themselves further on the subject of inheriting property taxes, property tax transfer, real property tax transfer or real estate tax transfer.

If these interests, and additionally related topics, describe you – then you’re in the right place. We welcome your opinions and comments, and we’ll add your text comments or audio/video commentary, if you have something new, valuable, or unique to add to the discourse here.

Blog Feed: Property Tax Transfer & Trust Loans – Transferring Property Taxes While Avoiding Property Tax Reassessment

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Property Tax Transfer

California Property Tax Transfer

There are, as we all know, numerous reasons that California property owners support Proposition 13 and California Proposition 58.  Proposition 13, passed by voters on June 6, 1978 protects individual consumer and corporate owners of residential and commercial real property from current property tax reassessment, with the exception of completion of new property construction and/or a change in property ownership.  Proposition 58  was approved as a California constitutional amendment by voters on November 6, 1986 – to exclude transfers of real property between parents and children from property tax reassessment.  Moreover, CA trust loans keep parents property taxes low, insuring that an even distribution can be made.

Generally, this gives adult offspring the ability to keep parents property taxes – in other words, to retain a parent’s lower Proposition 13 protected property tax rate. This frequently results in families saving literally thousands of dollars every calendar year. Moreover, these activities open up opportunities for  companies like the Commercial Loan Corporation to help  California beneficiaries and heirs who are middle class, not particularly wealthy, to qualify for Proposition 58 property tax benefits, by providing bridge loans to trusts and probate estates in order for an even distribution to be made for these heirs and beneficiaries. This is precisely how trust loans keep parents property taxes low in California.

Since 1978, Proposition 13 has saved California taxpayers over $528 billion – which has saved every taxpayer in California more than $60,000.  The 1978 Proposition 13 tax shelter finally provided residential and commercial property owners in California with tax relief that has proven, year after year and decade after decade, to be reliable, predictable and secure.

California home owners and renters all enthusiastically support Proposition 13, being able to reliably avoid  property tax reassessment at current tax levels; as well as Proposition 58, with respect to parent to child transfer of property, and parent to child exclusion from property reassessment…  and Proposition 193, involving grandparent to grandchild property transfers, when inheriting property taxes – which has collectively enabled families to comfortably transfer real property from parent to child, and keep parents property taxes, without being reassessed with constant  property tax increases.

Renters in California support Proposition 13, due to the fact that most residential and business renters are aware that as long as their landlord’s property taxes remain low, their rent is likely  not to go up.  Whereas if landlords’ taxes in California go up – we can predict with mathematical certainly that business  rents will follow.  Landlords will more or less have no choice but to increase their tenants’ rents.

Naturally, this would affect stores, gas stations, offices, industrial facilities, and so on – and that would ultimately affect the cost of food, of business goods and services; of gas;  so forth and so on.  Everything would go up.  And consumers would be hit hard.   Which is basically why renters in California support Prop 13, even if they’re not property owners themselves. In fact — why mostly everyone in California with a sense of community and fairness wholeheartedly supports California Proposition 13, 58 and 193.

Is Property Tax Transfer Causing CA Real Estate Shrinkage? Or is it a Normal Economic Trend?

Despite what critics say, there is no factual data or compelling case study that supports the frail argument that the main reason for home sales shrinkage, as well as sluggish price gains that have been  consistently hampering the California real estate market, is mainly due to property tax transfer and tax relief provided by Proposition 13, with Proposition 58 and Prop 193 thrown in for good measure.

When, in fact, generic economic statistics and anecdotal data actually tells us that shrinkage in the real estate market in California is clearly an outcome of normal fluctuations, up and down, in the real estate market and more importantly, severe fluctuations in the overall economy in California. Click Here to explore this point of view, which does appear to be logical… factoring in sky-rocketing gas taxes, and the particularly high cost of living overall in California these days. And, as many realtors insist based on nothing more than opinion and bias, not the fault of families keeping their family home “in the family”.

The leveling off of home prices, economists insist, is a national trend. And a 20-city composite index as well as the National Index have been recording the smallest price gains on home sales since 2012. David Blitzer, chairman of the S&P Dow Jones Index Committee, has said, “The patterns seen in the last year or more continue: Year-over-year real property price gains in most cities are consistently shrinking. Double-digit annual gains have vanished…”

For the broad picture, Blitzer says, “The difficulty facing housing may be too-high price increases”.  Not, we must point out, the absurd notion that the blame for California real estate market shrinkage or faltering home sale prices, lies with property tax transfer, avoiding property tax reassessment, or the ability to keep parents property taxes intact, with the ability to transfer parents property taxes when inheriting property taxes associated with real property transfers. This argument simply doesn’t hold up under scrutiny.

Moreover, many of these properties in question are quite old, and, frankly, usually require quite a bit of work involving a great deal of time and money… and would certainly not be selling at the fabulously high prices many investors and other real estate professionals claim they would be. To insist otherwise raises questions regarding the grasp many of these realtors and brokers have on the reality of the residential home market in California.

The bottom line is – California real estate investors would prefer to have as many homes on the market to buy and to sell solely to increase their profits; and the brokers and

realtors that are critics of Prop 13 and Proposition 58, or Proposition 193 (involving grandparents’ property transfers to grandchildren) prefer to have more homes to sell strictly for the additional commissions… Click Here: for more on the critics of these popular tax relief initiatives.

Click Here: for more on the critics of {Not, as they insist in the media, to maintain “fairness for families looking to buy property in California”. The “fairness” argument just isn’t holding water any more… Not that it ever did.

Let us know what your thoughts and opinions are, below.  We   publish viewers’ comments, based on editorial determinations:

How Has California Proposition 13 Evolved Over the Years?

Before 1978, rising California property taxes were escalating out of control. Since 1978, Proposition 13 dramatically lessened the accelerating anxiety that was negatively affecting middle class California home owners, who were, at that time, constantly worrying that their property taxes were going to continue going up.  Now, children keep parents property taxes in CA… and anxiety over property taxes has abated considerably. Prop 13 has evolved over the years, and has continued to provide positive tax relief for California home owners; industrial properties, and companies…

Click Here: to see how this is reflected in a recent PPIC.org survey (co-managed by Associate Survey Director) mirroring likely voters and/or real property owners in California.

To everyone’s relief, things changed when California Proposition 13 began protecting property owners and city or town local governments right away from financial insecurity largely caused by unpredictable property tax increases; as well as unexpected economic boom-bubbles and bursting bubbles within the real estate market.

That type of unpredictable financial stress hurt a lot of people in California; and often forced families to leave the beloved home they had grown up in… Unpredictable, rising property taxes caused a great deal of growing anxiety and fear among many middle class home owners, both young and old – often causing parents and grown children to reside far apart, against their wishes; frequently forcing families to downsize, or move to less desirable area; often doubling or even tripling the commute time to work. These issues do add up, and frequently affect quality of life.

From 1978 forward… as Proposition 13 took hold, this fear and disruption abated and decreased to a large degree… and California became a much happier, more secure state for home owners to live and raise families in.

Proposition 13 also put in place a much more reliable property tax revenue system that has grown roughly 7% per year since Proposition 13 has been in effect, and economists estimate revenue from property taxes will soon grow to a record high $74 billion.

All in all, Proposition 13 began and has remained a win-win proposition for Californians, along with Proposition 58 in 1986… strengthening family bonding and overall net worth, and providing an enormous blanket of peace of mind for home owners of all stripes, cultures, ages and incomes…. as well as those looking to become happy home owners.  Click here for more discussion on these positive affects, from both Proposition 58 and Prop 13.

Moreover, the ability to avoid property tax reassessment also works in concert with the need many home owners have for immediate funds from a trust loan, bearing in mind the ability for trust lenders to extend loans to irrevocable trusts, regardless of beneficiaries’ income status,  credit score or income.  Especially for new home owners, it’s critical to be able to keep parents’ property taxes, when inheriting property taxes that might otherwise be unmanageable.

Avoiding property tax reassessment is invaluable within the unique process of keeping real property “in the family”, by enabling real estate, home & land transfers, from parent to child  or child to parent – without present day tax value reassessment.

And now, although children keep parents property taxes in CA. and this tax relief goes unquestioned by home owners, California Proposition 193 has expanded this tax relief even further, allowing grandchildren to be excluded from reassessment when real property is transferred from grandparents to grandchildren. This shores up the close-family circle nicely.

Proposition 13 & 58 Tax Relief Still Popular with Californians, Despite Critics

Is Proposition 13 & 58 in demand despite critics… Without hesitation, the answer is yes. On June 6, 1978, 42 years ago, California voters passed Proposition 13 with 65% of the total vote. And to this day, interestingly enough, 65% of “likely voters” in California still support this tax relief initiative.

This popular and unique property tax break immediately froze California home owners’ real estate tax rate at 1% of the assessed value of their property – i.e., the assessed value on the day they bought the property.

So if you were a California resident at that time, you clearly saw that taxes on your home and land were no longer reassessed at current market value – and no longer went up more than 2% in total. And home owners in California are fortunate enough to be benefiting from the same formula 42 years later.

Moreover, the ability local governments had to raise money for city and town running budgets, including school funding – by arbitrarily raising real estate taxes whenever they felt it was needed – was all of a sudden severely restricted. And restrictions remain popular with consumers to this day.

The only parties perhaps not so thrilled with these restrictions and everything else associated with Prop 13 are political parties motivated to destroy Proposition 13 regardless how many critical protections for commercial and industrial properties are  guaranteed by Proposition 13, not to mention raising their commercial property taxes by billions… Plus certain individuals involved within the political arm of the educational system in California… as well as conventional executives, realtors, brokers, and other functionaries involved in the real estate market.

Click Here: For More Discussion on Critics of Proposition 13, at the Taxpayers Association… and on the stability home owners, renters & businesses have from Proposition 13, being able to avoid property tax reassessment; plus the positive affect Prop 13 has on local CA government – bearing in mind robust tax revenues pouring into local government coffers since Proposition 13 was passed.

Unfortunately, these folks in the California real estate business will simply have to continue riding the merry-go-round affecting the real estate market, with up-and-down sales cycles.  Let’s face it, they have had their mega profitable bull years, and now they’ll just have to learn how to cope with a bear market for a few years.

And pinning the blame on Proposition 13 and Prop 58, as well as blaming  “elderly home owners who don’t wish to put their house on the market”, simply isn’t going to fly. The shrinking numbers of homes becoming available to buy and sell is a natural business cycle.  And that’s just the way it goes.

Proposition 13 & 58 in demand despite critics?  It certainly is…

Click here for more on polling data and the vast popularity of Prop  13 in California, among middle class and upper middle class home owners of all ages…

With so many property owners inheriting property taxes – yet urgently needing to transfer parents’ property taxes so they can keep parents property taxes the way they are, and not fall prey to egregious tax increases. Hence, that 65% to 70% approval for Proposition 13 in California will only go up, and up, as the  reality of the real job market and the real job-based economy in general becomes clearer and hits home, in stark direct contrast to the sunny unrealistic TV news stories people are subjected to every night on CNN and MSNBC and network news,  citing the “strongest economy is 50 years!” while ignoring the millions of under-employed people with PHD’s waiting on tables and bar-tending…

Or, we’re forced to listen to uninformed politicians  breathlessly decrying the “lowest unemployment numbers in decades”, based solely on how many people are signing up for unemployment checks, while completely ignoring the millions of workers no longer receiving unemployment checks, who have fallen into the cracks and disappeared off the grid.

Perceiving all this realistically, and personally experiencing the ups and downs of real estate in one of the key property states in the union, middle class Californians realize the importance of saving every dollar they can – and this is where Proposition 13 and Prop 58 and 193 step in and provide such critical, often life-saving, support in this regard.

Please feel free to provide your thoughts below.  We are always interested in your comments and ideas, and will continue to publish your interesting feedback: